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Location Quotient (LQ) is a term that we hear a lot when working in the area of economic development so we thought it would be useful to explain exactly what it is and how it can be calculated using our online economic profile economy.id .

An  LQ is a simple ratio used to determine the concentration or dominance of a particular industry in a region (i.e. Local Government area) in comparison to a larger reference or benchmark region (i.e. State or Nation).  It is traditionally used to compare an industries share of regional employment, however it can also be used for other economic measures, such as value add, imports or exports.

economic modelling pic

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While the size of houses being built in Australia has, on average, been getting bigger, the average number of people living in them has traditionally been declining, and in more recent years has stabilised at an average of about 2.6 people per household.

Expanding houses in Australia

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Got anything to report?

Posted by Jim at 9:53 am on January 29, 2014

.id’s demographic and economic tools are easy to use, and web-based so they are available for anyone to explore, online.

But we realise that council officers often get asked for a hard-copy (or PDF) summary of some key information – maybe as a handout for a presentation, information for potential investors, or suburb and ward summaries.

If you are one of these council officers, take heart.  We have the perfect solution for you, and it’s already in profile.id, forecast.id and economy.id.

We have recently included a comprehensive, tailorable report writer. 

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Modelling the impact of changes to your economy

Posted by Glenn at 11:00 am on December 12, 2013

What effect would it have on your economy and your workforce if your area was able to attract a major new employer? What would be the ongoing job losses if a company were to close down in your area, not just in the company itself but in associated industries. Up to now, economy.id has been great at telling you about your economy in the past, how it has changed and how it compares to the region, and now .id are pleased to launch the Impact Assessment Model (IAM) for all our economy.id subscribers, which can answer just such questions as these.

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Do your industries mainly export or sell to locals?

Posted by Glenn at 3:00 pm on November 22, 2013

All areas need some capacity for industry to grow and change, but the focus of areas can be quite different. Many places have a particular industry that they are known for, or specialise in, and which may be their main export, while they may also have a range of industries which mainly support the local population. An area which is predominantly a dormitory suburb may only have those locally focused service industries. economy.id can help you understand which of your industries provide the vital export dollars for your economy, and which ones to try to develop in the future.

exportquality

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Check the data notes!

Posted by Glenn at 8:00 am on July 25, 2013

I know it’s boring, but some of the most useful information in the .id demographic tools is hidden away in a link at the bottom of each table. In profile.id, as well as having the exact wording of the Census question at the top right of each page, and beneath, the total population to which it refers, we include comprehensive data notes with each topic, to help you understand how to use it, where it comes from and how it’s put together.

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In the last week, we have added two exciting new features to profile.id, to further help with telling the demographic story of your area. A custom PDF generator enables you to build a PDF report based on topics and areas of your choice. The data exporter is back and enable you to download data from profile.id for further analysis.

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Our clients often express a bit of uncertainty about the difference between the various approaches to population forecasting.

In this blog I will give you a basic overview of the differences between the bottoms-up and tops-down approaches, as well explaining the benefits of bottoms-up population forecasting.

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Roll camera – more online training videos

Posted by Jim at 9:10 am on October 18, 2012

During October we have continued to build our online training library, with three new videos now available to view.

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It’s time to update the .id link page on your website

Posted by Jim at 11:05 am on July 30, 2012

Check the link text to the .id resources on your council website. Does it still say it has the “new” data from the 2001 census?  We’ve checked and lots do!

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Who responds to invitations for public consultation? Demographic analysis shows they are more likely to be male, older, Anglo Celtic, well-educated and to have a higher income. Missing are the submissions from the young, single parent families and ethnic minorities. This affects the agendas that are put forward and skews priorities. How do we achieve both better participation AND representation?

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How do I get information out of .id’s websites?

Posted by Nathan at 10:04 am on May 30, 2012

One of the questions we get asked most often at .id training sessions is how to get the data, charts and text out of the .id websites and into your working documents and presentations. This blog will step you through it.

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Making sense of population counts

Posted by Jim at 6:30 am on April 28, 2012

When people ask – “How many people live in Statsville?” they expect a straight forward, unambiguous answer. If only it were that simple!  Believe it or not there are several different ways to count people in places. Do you want to know how many were there on a particular day, or how many usually live there?  In this blog we explain the different types of population statistics and when to use each one.

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What is your consultation delivering?

Posted by Penny at 6:30 am on April 27, 2012

Many New Zealand councils are still up to their armpits in the 2012 Long Term Plan (LTP) consultation. It’s a huge undertaking and one of the most important consultation tasks conducted by councils. I talked a little in my last blog about how much resource is put into public consultation these days, so I pose the question …

How do you know when your public consultation has been effective?

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To develop successful Economic Development strategies, you need to know about your local economy. You need to know its strengths, and weaknesses.  You need to know where it fits in the overall competitive framework – and what role and function your economy serves.

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economy.id just got even better

Posted by Glenn at 8:00 am on February 14, 2012

economy.id is a fantastic resource for helping a Local Government Area describe, explore and promote the local economy. We’ve just rolled out a set of changes to make it even better. These changes have resulted from client feedback, and also input from our economic modellers, NIEIR.  Here we’ll go through the main changes and how best to make use of them.

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At .id we are keen users of Census data and are eagerly anticipating the release of 2011 data in June.  However, it’s not as if the ABS sits around twiddling its thumbs in non-Census years – they have an active demography program with regular releases to keep the Australian public, business and governments information of the latest trends.  We use a lot of this data at .id in our products and services.  What are some of the more important releases, what information do they contain, and where can I find them?

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How to map population change in forecast.id

Posted by Glenn at 11:15 am on January 30, 2012

forecast.id is a great tool for understanding how your area’s population is changing, and what are the likely future outcomes of demographic trends and housing development. Many users are unaware that forecast.id contains a comprehensive mapping section, which is a great way of visualising how population is changing within your local government area. It allows you to pinpoint areas with the greatest change, and target your local government services over the next 20 years.

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Migration within Australia – the hidden story in profile.id

Posted by Glenn at 6:00 am on December 9, 2011

In the “Additional Data” section of profile.id is the Migration section. This section contains some of the most powerful storytelling within the profile, and can explain a lot of the changes that you see in your area. The migration section tells you why the population is going up or down and where people are moving from and to. While we spend a lot of time looking at migration from overseas, migration from within Australia is just as important, and in many areas much more important.

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Where is the best place to put the .id links on your website?

Posted by Jim at 6:30 am on November 28, 2011

Local governments subscribe to .id tools for their own use, and also to provide the information to their communities, local businesses, investors and potential residents. In doing so, they provide links from their own website to the .id tools.  The question is, where should you put the links?

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economy.id – using the infrastructure page for promotion

Posted by Glenn at 6:30 am on November 14, 2011

Forty councils and regions across Australia have now signed on to economy.id, the online economic and workforce profile. economy.id helps councils to describe, explore and promote their economy. You can see the full list on our website. economy.id is a fantastic resource for understanding the size of your local economy, how it is changing, the breakdown of key industries and characteristics of the workers in each industry. There is also a section called “Infrastructure” which can be used as a promotional tool. Read on to see how.

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How to get the most out of your social atlas

Posted by Glenn at 9:00 am on October 23, 2011

Most councils who subscribe to profile.id also have atlas.id. The online social atlas contains over 70 maps which allow you to see how different population groups are distributed across your LGA. But atlas.id is more than just maps. It is also the easiest way compare results for each suburb and your benchmark areas as well. Read on to find out how.

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Income data is one of the most important indicators of socio-economic status. One of the most useful analysis tools in profile.id (and also used in economy.id) are income quartiles. They enable you to compare incomes (or housing payments) over time, to see whether they are increasing or decreasing in your area relative to a benchmark. Though relatively simple to calculate and even simpler to use, many users of .id’s community profiles aren’t aware that they are available. Read on to see how to use quartiles.

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On the .id website homepage, (www.id.com.au) there is a small icon in the top right corner labelled “client login”, behind which hides a wealth of features for subscribing councils.


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What is employment self-sufficiency?

Posted by Glenn at 5:32 pm on June 28, 2011

In a recent blog we looked at employment self-containment, which is a measure that looks at the proportion of residents who work locally. Self-sufficiency is the opposite side of the coin. It looks at what proportion of local jobs are filled by local residents. If that makes any sense to you, you’re doing better than most!  While self-containment is usually an important measure for suburban councils with less jobs than residents, inner urban councils, and more affluent areas are also interested in self-sufficiency.

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What is employment self-containment?

Posted by Glenn at 4:21 pm on June 21, 2011

Self-containment of employment and self-sufficiency of employment are two terms which are often used in Local Government, but they have varying definitions from place to place, and their usefulness also varies. The new, improved version of economy.id which was recently launched for .id’s 31 subscribing councils uses these terms explicitly, where the old version didn’t, so it’s worthwhile having a look at them and what they can do for you. This article will focus on self-containment of employed residents.

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The ABS is moving from the concept of “Capital City Statistical Division” to “Greater Capital City Statistical Areas”, as part of the new geography – the ASGS. While this may just seem like a bit of jargon, it’s actually got quite a significant impact – partly because a lot more ABS collections produce data at this level, and partly because the capital city is just more visible than other areas. This is Part 5 in our series about what the new ABS geography looks like and how it will affect you.

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Counting employment – which figures to use

Posted by Glenn at 7:22 pm on May 19, 2011

One of the most important bits of economic information a council can have is about employment. However there are different ways of measuring employment and it can be confusing figuring out which one to use.This article is designed to help demystify them all and give you an idea of which ones to use when, and what their limitations are.

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The ABS is introducing a new geographic classification, which means the geography for which statistics are generated from a wide variety of collections, including the Census, is going to change radically. This is Part 4 in our series about what the new geography looks like and how it will affect you.

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At training sessions for profile.id and economy.id, we often get asked how to interpret some of the data presented in these tools.  We suggest a simple but powerful technique called “dominant-emerging” analysis as a really good way to make sense of the data. It is based on asking two questions about any area.

  1. What role does it play within its region?          2. How is it changing?

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New ABS Geography part 3. Replacing SLAs with SA2s

Posted by Glenn at 11:20 am on April 21, 2011

Probably the most radical change in the new ABS geography is the move to SA2s (“Statistical Area Level 2” – another imaginative name…). These replace Statistical Local Areas (SLAs), which were always a bit misunderstood.  This is the third part in my series on the new ABS geography.

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The power of data download

Posted by Glenn at 1:27 pm on March 31, 2011

With the user-friendly interface of profile.id, it’s easy to get most information you are seeking, by navigating around using the menu options and tabs.  But if you are seeking specific information, data download can get you targeted and accurate information, fast. It is especially useful for comparing between a number of small areas at once, across several Census years, and also has some additional data which is not displayed in the main interface of profile.id.

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Case study – City of Unley Section 30 review

Posted by Jim at 2:57 pm on February 18, 2011

One of the problems in conducting a Section 30 review in older, established areas is the need to recognise and preserve the areas that define the character of the city, while still allowing for development of an appropriate type to allow the city to grow and increase in diversity.

The City of Unley recently used their .id community profile to assist in conducting their Section 30 review.

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Over the past few years, the Australian Bureau of Statistics has been working out a whole new Statistical Geography for Australia.

Now Statistical Geography may not sound like the most interesting topic, unless you work here at .id in which case it’s fascinating! It underpins most of the data that you can get from the Census, and most of our work at .id, as well as a whole lot of other ABS collections. ABS is moving to a completely new set of areas for the release of data, which will change what data is available for what areas. Read the rest of this entry

How to identify a gentrifying area?

Posted by Glenn at 10:32 am on February 15, 2011

Pilates, goat’s cheese: there goes the neighbourhood

This article in last week’s Age talks about Northcote and Maribyrnong and how they have become gentrified.

While you can’t find too much about pilates, goats’ cheese pizzas and Subarus from Darebin’s community profile, it’s not too hard to see whether an area is gentrifying, and in the case of these two suburbs, the article isn’t picking up on anything new, it’s been happening for quite some time!

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Should I use Enumerated or Usual Residence data?

Posted by Glenn at 3:50 pm on December 23, 2010

One of the most common questions we are asked about Census data is whether it’s best to use Enumerated or Usual Residence data when making statements about populations. Our Census product, profile.id, gives users the option to use either, with both options prominently displayed with radio buttons to select at the top of each table. But which should you use?

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